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Archive for May, 2013

Many authors and coaches advise working on several desires at once. For instance; social desires, romantic desires, financial desires, career desires, family desires etc.  This approach is not ideal. When we concentrate on our desire, we invite it into our life. The more strongly we concentrate on a desire, the stronger the invitation we send to it.

If we concentrate on more than one desire at a time, we divide our concentration. Thus our invitation, to ALL our desires, is weakened and made less urgent. The law of attraction responds to our divided concentration by giving us weaker and delayed manifestations of our desires or no significant manifestations at all.

As the old saying goes, he who chases two rabbits catches none. Concentration creates power; while dissipation produces weakness. Laser like focus on one key touchstone desire at a time brings the quickest, most powerful and gratifying results.

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Many people have the wrong idea about visualization. There is no bigger waste of time than visualizing stacks of money, fancy homes, prizes etc. Don’t visualize your prize. Visualize yourself enjoyably performing the acts which lead to it. Manifestation is a process. It is not producing things we desire out of thin air by thinking about them.

Visualizing stacks of money, jewelry, fancy homes etc. does not create abundance.  Visualizing the process of enjoyably adding value, demonstrating your value and claiming your desired compensation does.

Don’t envision yourself as a superstar musician living in a huge mansion. Visualize yourself creating great music, entertaining vast numbers of fans and negotiating for ever bigger recording contracts, tours etc.

Don’t visualize yourself being famous. Visualize yourself having fun doing the deeds that make you famous.

Don’t visualize yourself sitting in the corner office with the magnificent view. Visualize yourself setting sales records and motivating staff etc., which results in your promotion to the corner office. Visualize yourself enjoying the process which leads to what you desire.

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Cooking is not my forte. When I see a recipe calling for more than about 5 ingredients, my eyes glaze over.  I get intimidated by the recipe.  I realize there is almost no chance I will buy the 8 or more ingredients needed for many recipes. I think about the fact that I seldom, if ever, use most of the ingredients in the recipe.  Than I think about where I’m going to store the remainders of the ingredients I won’t use again for a long time. I think of the ingredients growing moldy in my fridge…The realization soon hits me that I will never prepare this recipe. It just won’t happen.

On the other hand, if I see a recipe that looks good, and it has only about 4 or 5 ingredients and I have two or three of them in the house; I think, “I can do that”. I could actually prepare that recipe. It is doable. That is the feeling you need to have about your short term goals; whether they are fitness goals, career goals, financial goals, social goals or any other type of goals. Simplify them till you get the “I can do that” feeling. All human progress is simply doing what you can do till you can do more.

An example of a personal “I can do that” 4 ingredient recipe

http://quick-dish.tablespoon.com/2013/04/23/4-ingredient-peanut-chicken-ramen/

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Napoleon Hill, author of “Think and Grow Rich”, largely fathered the self help movement that has become a multi billion dollar industry in North America alone. Hill’s fans, such as myself, revere his writing for his sensible, simple, straight forward style, devoid of any pretense.

I find that no matter how often you read Hill’s books, there are always new things to learn. One such nugget from “Think and Grow Rich” is Hill’s advice on how to become more relaxed. Hill suggests you keep a sock handy, where you can view it often, and imitate its formless sprawl. Let  the sock inspire you to release resistance and submit to relaxation. Hill claims cats usually respond the same way when you pick them up. I don’t know about cats. Some don’t like to be picked up. However, the sock example rings totally true. For me, it works. I suggest you try it too.

Many decades after Hill’s works were first published, they still have much to offer us.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmCtWskzmAQ

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